Droga5 Elevates Felix Richter and Tim Gordon to Co-CCOs

Neil Heymann will become agency's first global chief creative officer

Tim Gordon and Felix Richter will now take the creative helm at Droga5 New York. - Credit by Droga5
Headshot of Minda Smiley

Droga5 has made a flurry of promotions at its New York office, some of which signal future expansion for the agency, which was acquired by Accenture Interactive earlier this year.

Neil Heymann, who stepped into the chief creative officer role last year after Droga5 fired Ted Royer amid reports of an internal investigation, will now become the agency’s first global chief creative officer. Droga5 also has an office in London, where David Kolbusz serves as chief creative officer.

In light of Heymann’s promotion, Felix Richter and Tim Gordon, both executive creative directors at Droga5, will now serve as co-chief creative officers in New York. Richter joined Droga5 in 2011 following a stint at Y&R as a copywriter, and has worked on brands including Under Armour, Google and Mailchimp since joining.

Gordon joined Droga5 in 2008, just two years after it was founded, and has since climbed the creative ranks, working with brands including Puma and The New York Times.

The agency has also promoted Alexander Nowak, who will now take on the role of global head of art. Previously, Nowak served as executive creative director. Juliana Cobb, who joined the agency three years ago as group creative director, will now become executive creative director.

Julia Albu, who currently serves as group account director, will now serve as head of creative integration, where she will oversee operations for the creative and design departments. She fills a role previously held by Joanne Peters, who recently left Droga5 to join Peloton Interactive.

David Droga, founder and creative chairman of Droga5, said in a statement that there’s “nothing better than seeing your best and brightest flourish from within,” adding that it’s “exciting and intimidating to see if we can extend our unique offering to a few other compelling markets.”

The promotions come after a whirlwind couple of years for Droga5. Last year, the agency let Royer go, citing the agency’s commitment to “maintaining a safe and inclusive environment.” Earlier this year, Droga5 surprised the industry when the agency announced its decision to be acquired by Accenture Interactive, with many questioning how the move might impact its work and culture.


@Minda_Smiley minda.smiley@adweek.com Minda Smiley is an agencies reporter at Adweek.
{"taxonomy":"","sortby":"","label":"","shouldShow":""}