Fiverr Launches Freelance Marketplace Just for Political Gigs

Jobs range from copy-editing campaign materials to speechwriting

The freelance website Fiverr hopes to democratize the ad-making process. - Credit by Fiverr
Headshot of Sara Jerde

As political ad spending is projected to reach record-breaking heights during the 2020 political season, a new website for freelancers is creating a marketplace for campaign-related tasks.

Fiverr, a platform that connects freelancers with projects, is opening what it’s calling a “politics store” with specific jobs related to running a campaign, from copy-editing campaign materials to creating banner ads and speechwriting. It’s an effort to democratize the process, according to Brent Messenger, vice president of public policy and community at Fiverr.

“Small campaigns have never had access to the kinds of tools that big campaigns have,” Messenger said. “The most potentially game-changing thing here is that a campaign that runs on a shoestring budget can actually have all the same types of assets that a major campaign can have.”

Political ad spending among presidential candidates is expected to reach nearly $10 billion, according to the most recent estimate from GroupM.

Fiverr’s intention is to work for every candidate, from the smallest local races to White House hopefuls. The platform already offers services across eight verticals, including graphic design and digital marketing, and claims to have facilitated over 50 million transactions among freelancers in more than 160 countries.

Michael Ceraso, co-founder of Winning Margins, a company that works with Democratic political candidates, has used Fiverr in his own campaign work. Ceraso was also previously the New Hampshire state director for Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg’s 2020 campaign and served as California state director for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential bid.

“The big focus for me is how impactful it’s going to help down-ballot candidates, especially if they’re from areas and communities that can’t raise a ton of money,” Ceraso said. “I think Fiverr makes it extremely affordable for them to be able to do more and to be able to reach the audiences that they want to reach.”


@SaraJerde sara.jerde@adweek.com Sara Jerde is publishing editor at Adweek, where she covers traditional and digital publishers’ business models. She also oversees political coverage ahead of the 2020 election.
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