Snap’s VP of Marketing Is Leaving the Company

Steve LaBella joined in 2016

Snap Inc. VP of Marketing Steve LaBella will leave next month. - Credit by LinkedIn: Steve LaBell
Headshot of Marty Swant

Steve LaBella, Snap Inc.’s vp of marketing, will be leaving next month, the company has confirmed.

During his brief tenure at Snap, LaBella, who joined in 2016, helped create and execute a number of the company’s campaigns, including its first TV spot earlier this year, Snapchat Spectacles-branded security trays at airports and billboards. Prior to joining the company, LaBella had previously served in marketing roles at Fischer-Price and Mattel.

The news of his departure was first reported by Cheddar on Friday morning.

A Snap spokesperson said LaBella was leaving for personal reasons and plans to stay through November until the company finds a replacement.

“Steve has been a valuable member of our team, building our consumer marketing department and continually finding new ways to surprise and inspire the Snapchat community,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “We are grateful for all of his hard work and many contributions and wish him the very best.”

LaBella is just the latest to the leave the company. Last month, Imran Khan, Snap’s chief strategy officer, resigned. In February, Jeff Lucas, then the vp of sales, also left before landing at Verizon-owned Oath a few months later.

While Snapchat has had its fair share of high-profile exits, it’s not the only platform to lose some of its top execs in recent weeks. Late last month, Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger resigned from Facebook, where they’d worked for the past eight years since the company was acquired. And earlier this week, Google’s head of advertising, Sridhar Ramaswamy, left to join the venture capital firm Greylock partners.

Snapchat has struggled to get brands and agencies to understand the scale, demographics and tools on the platform. The company reported a loss of 3 million users during its most recent quarterly earnings. Meanwhile, its stock price continues to decline, hitting an all-time low on Thursday at $7.80 per share before falling even further today to $7.62 per share; it then rebounded slightly back to $7.80 around 3 p.m.


@martyswant martin.swant@adweek.com Marty Swant is a former technology staff writer for Adweek.
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