Tumblr Unveils Digital Literacy Initiative World Wide What

The blogging platform teamed up with UK nonprofit Ditch the Label

World Wide What is debuting with six informational videos - Credit by Tumblr
Headshot of David Cohen

Tumblr teamed up with U.K. nonprofit Ditch the Label on digital literacy initiative World Wide What.

World Wide What is debuting with six informational videos aimed at helping the Tumblr community with issues including fake news, cyberbullying and authenticity, and Tumblr said the videos use language and imagery that is native to its platform, including GIFs, short texts and memes.

The six videos are:

Fake News, Skewed Views


Don’t @ Me (Cyberbullying)


Authenticity Online


Pull Down to Refresh


Felt Cute Might Delete Later


A Safer Internet: Moderation


Some of the posts on World Wide What will be accompanied by additional on-platform initiatives including Answer Times, where guests share their knowledge on the topics being discussed.

The National Association for Media Literacy Education will take questions about fake news on Jan. 8.

On Jan. 15, Ditch the Label will discuss cyberbullying.

I Weigh founder Jameela Jamil will answer questions about the effects of inauthentic social media personalities Jan. 22.

And someone from Tumblr’s leadership team will talk about user safety at a date that has yet to be determined.

Tumblr said in a blog post introducing World Wide What, “The internet can be a really wonderful place. It’s changed the way we learn and research, the way we connect with others and the way we express ourselves in positive, powerful ways. But it’s no secret that these improvements also present us with unique challenges. We can learn new things faster, but sometimes we have to sort through piles of misinformation while we do—and it’s not always easy to detect. We’re able to connect with people we never would have met otherwise thanks to social media, but it can encourage addictive behavior in the applications that keep us connected. We’re able to express ourselves more easily, but we sometimes overshare in ways detrimental to our careers, reputation and mental health.”


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
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